– Logic Pro x ideas | logic pro x, logic pro, music mixing

– Logic Pro x ideas | logic pro x, logic pro, music mixing

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Logic pro x tutorial recording vocals free

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Get my go-to vocal compression settings, learn the best compressors and nail Logic Pro Tutorial, Macbook Pro Tips, Music Recording Studio, Logic Pro X. Larry discusses what the video series sets out to accomplish, such as recording the vocal, mic types, pre-amps, tips for managing vocal sessions and more. Before you start recording, make sure your track is record enabled. Before Logic Pro can record anything, you have to tell it what track(s) you.
 
 

Vocal Compression: Learn How to Mix Like the Pros | Logic pro x, Logic pro, Music tutorials.

 

Microphone Basics is supported by readers. When you buy with our links, we may earn a commission. Learn more. If you want your tracks to keep up on the sonic stage, you need to learn how to mix in Logic Pro X. Same goes for producing electronic music in Logic, or any other software for that matter. Sure, the instruments sound pretty great out of the box, but once you layer in several synths, a couple of drum kits, a sweet bass line and some vocal chops, you start to realise something.

In minutes, you can use Autotune in Logic Pro X to clean up a vocal track, switch to the Scissors tool to make some quick cuts, and apply automation in an instant. And if you mess it up, Command Z is your best friend! Audio editing meant physically slicing tape with a razor, and splicing them back together — no Command Z here…. Applying compression to a track meant physically patching in an outboard compressor and fiddling with actual knobs. And with physical outboard gear comes a limitation, you only have as many compressors as you have!

Luckily, we live in an age where your wildest dreams are at your fingertips. Every engineer, producer or audio enthusiast has their own process for mixing, and there is in no way one best way to mix.

There are a few best practices though, and so in this tutorial you will learn about 5 key areas of mixing in Logic Pro X:. Remember though, every rule is made to be broken, and what matters is the end result.

So, experiment a little and find what works for you. Chances are the names of your tracks are all over the place, like they are in our session. This is especially important when in the mixer view as the text display is fairly narrow. Our session is still looking pretty bland, so we are going to add a splash of color. Our session is pretty small at only 12 tracks, if you have a large session, color coding is vital.

Most people apply colors based on instrument type e. Hit X to bring up the mixer, select the tracks, and apply some color again. A static mix involves setting the volume or level for each track, and creating some stereo depth using pan. Hit X to bring up the mixer, and use the faders to balance out the volume of each track.

For example, kick drums and bass guitar often battle for space in the low frequencies, while electric guitars and vocals can have issues in the mids. Pay close attention to the Stereo Out track, which is the master output. Try to keep the level at around -6dB. Remember, 0dB is the ceiling, and once you start pushing levels above this, digital distortion occurs.

This is the pan pot panoramic potentiometer , and you will use it to position each track within the stereo field. Whereas the fader controls the level or volume of each track, pan controls whether the track appears in the left or right side of the mix, or anywhere in between.

Again, there are no hard and fast rules here, though typically lead vocals, bass, kick and snare are kept at centre. You should experiment with opening up the cymbals or overhead tracks as wide as possible, and if you have multiple guitar or keyboard tracks, try panning them left and right too.

Try sitting the guitars just inside the cymbals, or vice versa. If you have several vocal tracks, for example one lead vocal and two backing vocal harmonies, try panning the harmonies a little to either side of the stereo field for a thick sound. EQ is the process of manipulating the frequency spectrum of a track, and is used to either cut offensive frequencies, or boost desired ones.

It features low and high cuts, low and high shelves, and 4 bell peak type nodes. You can edit the peak frequency by simply clicking and holding a node and moving it left to right, and you can apply a boost or cut by dragging it up or down.

You can also click and drag on the numerical equivalent at the bottom of the interface, or double click and enter a specific value. Where equalization is concerned with controlling the frequency range in a mix, compression is used to control the dynamic range of your tracks. It can also be used to change the tonal character of an instrument. Certain guitar or bass notes may have been played more softly or louder than others, or your vocalist may have moved closer to or further away from the microphone during recording.

As with equalizers, compressors are incredibly complex, as you can see from the number of controls in the above GUI. Compressors work to control the dynamic range by compressing or turning down , audio signals when they go above a certain level. You use the controls of the compressor to set the point at which compression occurs, to what degree, and how quickly among other things. The five most important parameters to get the hang of are threshold, ratio, attack, release, and make up.

The threshold controls the point at which the compressor kicks into action. You can think of it like setting the ceiling. When the track level reaches above this ceiling the threshold , the compressor will engage and compress or turn down the audio. The ratio control tells the compressor how much to compress the signal above that level. This is expressed as a ratio such as , etc. The higher the ratio, the more the compressor reacts.

At a ratio of , our dB signal will be compressed to dB the difference between the threshold [db] and the signal level [dB] divided by 2. The attack and release controls determine how fast the compressor kicks in when a signal passes the threshold attack , and how quickly the compressor disengages after the signal falls back below the threshold release.

These two controls affect how much compression is applied, for how long, and greatly contribute to the sonic quality of the compression. Sometimes labelled make up gain, this control is used to match the compressed and uncompressed signal levels.

Because compressors often make things sound louder, it can be difficult to compare and accurately gauge the effect of a compressor when switching between the affected and unaffected signal. Because the human ear naturally favours louder signals , the louder, compressed track often sounds better by comparison. Use the make up control to ensure the levels are consistent so you can judge the effect of compression more accurately. Compression is best used to control overly dynamic instruments, for example, an inconsistent vocal recording.

Use the loop control in Logic to select a section of vocals, and open up the compressor plugin. Start with a modest ratio of is generally seen as the middle ground in compression ratios. Roll back the threshold control until the compressor starts engaging when the loud vocals kick in. The goal here is to allow the compressor to kick into gear only when the vocals get too loud, not at all times. That said, you may want to apply a little compression to the vocal tracks e.

If the compressor is acting on vocal transients too slowly, make the attack quicker. Experiment with different attack, release, threshold, and ratio settings until you find the perfect setting. Logic, being Logic, has tonnes of built in effects that you can use to spice up your tracks, add some depth and interest, and make your productions sound just like the pros do. Imagine a ball of blue light directly in front of you.

The horizontal field left to right , is controlled by pan. Whereas the vertical up and down , represents frequency, which is dependent on the type of instrument bass guitar vs violin for example , as well as any equalization applied. The volume or level controlled by the fader as well as compression , is represented by the light becoming brighter or duller. This is controlled using reverb. By using all four fields or spectrums stereo, dynamic, frequency and depth , you can give each instrument its own space in a mix, meaning every track can be heard clearly.

Before the world of plugins, and even before outboard hardware effects, reverb was literally created in a physical space. For example, if you wanted a big chamber sound on a choir, you had to record the choir in a big chamber!

Obviously this is incredibly inconvenient, so sound engineers quickly figured out how to emulate this effect using springs and plates. Predelay The predelay parameters control the amount of time in milliseconds between the dry signal and the first reflection.

Reflectivity Have you noticed how some rooms are more reflective or noisy than others? Think of the difference in reflectiveness between an empty hall, and your living room with carpet, sofa and thick curtains. The higher it is set, the longer the reverb effect will last for. Higher settings are great for creative effects, though if you are trying to create a small amount of space on a vocal or lead instrument, try rolling this back a bit. Turn Wet all the way up and Dry all the way down, and you will only hear the affected signal.

Experiment with the two controls to find the perfect balance for your application. Typically, bass instruments are left out of the reverb game.

This is because tracks tend to get muddy when reverb is applied on the low end. Have a play if you like, but make sure you are paying attention to the clarity in the low end when using reverb on kick drums or bass. To help bring the kit together nicely, try sending some of the other drums to the same reverb, such as the toms. One of the most widely used effects amongst guitarists, delay is an effect often employed by sound engineers to create depth and interest in a mix.

The difference between delay and reverb is that delay is not space focused it is not emulating a physical space , it is a time based effect that makes use of a repeat as opposed to a reflection. It might help to imagine delay as the reflection from a single surface.

Delay Time As delay is a more musical effect than reverb, its time factors are often represented by note lengths i. This is a cool way to produce an interesting ping-pong type effect in a mix. Alternatively, you can set the left and right signals to the same delay time for a more traditional delay effect. Feedback The feedback parameter essentially controls how many repeats you will hear, and therefore how long the delay effect continues for.

When this is set to 0, you will hear only one repeat. As you turn up the feedback, more and more of the affected signal is fed back into the delay effect. For example, you may have several vocal tracks for which you wish to use just one reverb type. If your head is spinning trying to understand the difference between sends, busses, and aux tracks, try thinking of it like this. The bus is a path that picks up all the passengers tracks , and takes them to the next location.

 

– Logic Pro X 502: Studio Series – Recording Vocals

 

Setting up a Template project with a few tweaks here and there could save you time in the future and increase your workflow. Because if you follow this tutorial, you should have to do everything just once and then hopefully your future production life will be easier.

This is an ideal scenario for the majority of us who use Logic Pro X in the same way and for the same kinds of music production, whenever we boot the software up to compose. So stick with us while we guide you through the process of setting up a project, tailoring it to suit you and your music, creating templates and speeding up your workflow. And if you are an experienced user, who knows, you might see Logic in a new light, and you might save time too.

Focus On — Your Audio Interface You will need a decent audio interface when recording with Logic and our tutorial helps you assign and set up a Template project for use with one. You can get really simple ones that allow a couple of tracks to be recorded and played back, or complex multi input and output interfaces that allow entire band performances to be recorded into Logic for editing later.

We will create a new Template file…. Select your audio input device and sample rate from the drop down menus on the left. Similarly you want the main outputs of Logic linked to the speakers that you have connected to the outputs of your interface. All of this is included and you should only have to do this here very often it will already be set up for you. In this case we want this track to be our record input so have assigned it to 1 on the Saffire. In our case we simply have the mono input from a synth.

Here they are shown as channels 1 and 2 out. Our main inputs and outputs for our project are now set and our interface assigned. If we hit the mixer icon top left we can see our track and its Input is set to channel 1 on our interface. This tutorial is endorsed by Point Blank.

You can study sound to picture on their Music Production Diploma courses, with pro industry tutors. Soundcore Motion Boom Plus review: Getting the party started just got a whole lot easier. Tone Empire Firechild compressor review: The vari-mu king gets convolved.

 
 

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